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WHAT IS CHPS & WHY IS IT NECESSARY?

CONTENT SUMMARY

Hospice can be a wonderful program if the perfect combination of caregivers and educators are present to make it work. Sadly, the program is vastly underused, mostly on account of physicians (as explained here). Once on Hospice, however, there are many reasons it fails to serve patients the way they expect (explained here). Because our country needs a new end-of-life model - one capable of doing the things Hospice cannot - we created a program, called CHPS, based on experimental programs done elsewhere in the country (explained here). We believe our model is superior to past trials for many reasons. Below you will find what the program is, and how it works for our patients and their caregivers (explained here). 

WHY IS HOSPICE UNDERUSED?

RSHC firmly supports Hospice and we will assist any patient in starting Hospice care, assuming qualifications are met and it's what the patient wishes. In an ideal setting, Hospice can provide everything a patient needs in his or her final six months. Sadly, the program is vastly underused,* despite the fact it started two decades ago as a Medicare benefit.

WHY HOSPICE SOMETIMES FAILS TO MEET PATIENT NEEDS?

RSHC firmly supports Hospice and we will assist any patient in starting Hospice care, assuming qualifications are met and it's what the patient wishes. In an ideal setting, Hospice can provide everything a patient needs in his or her final six months. Sadly, the program is vastly underused,* despite the fact it started two decades ago as a Medicare benefit.

Overwhelmingly, elderly patients express a preference for dying at home, as years of studies via patient surveys and patient interviews have taught us. ** Yet, roughly 60% of deaths occur in the hospital,* even if patients are on Hospice. Despite the attempt by most Hospice companies to provide Palliative care to dying, home-bound patients, there is often not enough caregiver support, training, or planning to prevent an emergency call to the Paramedics. For example, a patient dying of COPD may have a sudden event of severe respiratory distress. If the caregiver (often a spouse or child) was never trained to manage this inevitable event, then the caregiver will often call 911 out of desperation to stop their loved one's suffering.

When doing hospital work, Dr. Ren was commonly on the receiving end of these horrific situations. When such cases arrived in the middle of the night, it could be difficult to get a Hospice nurse there quickly. Often, management decisions had to be made quickly and occasionally, a patient would have to temporarily "give up" their Hospice coverage for treatment interventions. Usually, the dying patient would be admitted to the hospital, only to die hours to days later as an inpatient.

The amount of guilt this caused for family members and medical caretakers was immense. In fact, it was one of the primary reasons Dr. Ren wanted to change the current health care model; people should meet death on their own terms. In many cases they can, but only when provided with proper and skilled support.

Occasionally, a patient could be stabilized enough to return home and resume traditional Hospice care. However - and this is important - multiple studies indicate that even brief hospitalizations are likely to accelerate a patient's decline.* For a variety of reasons, hospitalizations hit the elderly and frail like sledgehammers. Hospice patients have virtually no reserves for handling the drama that comes with admission, and caregivers often claim hospitalizations cause loved ones to take twice as long to return to baseline after returning home (while some never do).*

Such scenarios could be prevented with a new end-of-life model focusing on comprehensive patient and caregiver education, medical management, and Palliative services.

HOW DOES CHPS HELP PATIENTS & CAREGIVERS?